See also: scandi and scandì

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Clipping of Scandinavian

AdjectiveEdit

Scandi (not comparable)

  1. (informal) Scandinavian; from or pertaining to Scandinavia.
    • 2012, Signe Johansen, Scandilicious Baking, Hachette UK →ISBN
      Longstanding maritime traditions and extensive coastlines mean that seafood also plays a major role in Scandi cuisine, and in my baking.
    • 2013, Sophie Body-Gendrot, Mike Hough, Klara Kerezsi, René Lévy, Sonja Snacken, The Routledge Handbook of European Criminology, Routledge →ISBN, page 270
      When it comes to fictional accounts, and notwithstanding the current 'Scandi Crime' trend following in the wake of Stieg Larsson's Millennium trilogy, Norwegian viewers have predominantly been exposed to Anglo-American programming.
    • 2015, Helen Russell, The Year of Living Danishly: Uncovering the Secrets of the World’s Happiest Country, Icon Books →ISBN
      Things start encouragingly enough with attractive redbrick mansion blocks and municipal buildings, cobbled streets and interesting boutiques nestled between big high street stalwarts. The place looks a lot like a Scandi version of Guildford.

NounEdit

Scandi (plural Scandis)

  1. (informal) A Scandinavian; someone from Scandinavia.
    • 2013, Anonymous, The Secret Player, Hachette UK →ISBN
      A bonus for those working on their tans in the stands, but in the dressing room the made-for-the-shade Brits and the Scandis are sweating uncomfortably already.
    • 2014, Graeme Maughan, Backpackers, Lulu Press, Inc →ISBN
      One of the Scandis, Sandra, had talked about how the men in south east Asia stared openly at women.

AnagramsEdit