Talk:ware

What is the difference between ware and goods? Ferike333 21:01, 18 August 2009 (UTC)

RFCEdit

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There is a word pronounced /ˈwɒri/ that has "ware" as one of its spellings. This pronunciation has crept on to the page for ware without a definition being given because "ware" is listed on the rhymes page for -ɒri. Please could someone add this word. Alternative spellings are "warree", "whare", "wharre" and "wharry". — Paul G 16:43, 24 February 2007 (UTC)

RFV discussion: August–October 2012Edit

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Rfv-sense: countable, usually in combination "An individual good."

I am having trouble finding credible citations for this. My intuition would have wares as plural only (not counted: *"five wares") and ware as almost always uncountable, exception for genre/style sense used in archaeology etc. It would not surprise me if there were a time when there was singular countable sense, but I'm not seeing evidence. I would be satisfied three credible cites of "an [X] ware"/"an [X]-ware"/"an [X]ware" for any X. Evidence of contemporary usage would be particularly useful. DCDuring TALK 20:55, 11 August 2012 (UTC)

Note that there is a suffix -ware, derived from software, patterned after hardware, that is not what this RfV relates to. DCDuring TALK 20:58, 11 August 2012 (UTC)
I'm also doubtful of "Goods or a type of goods offered for sale or use." All the example actually back up -ware not ware. If it can't be used outside of combinations, it must be a suffix. A 'noun' can stand on its own without an accompanying morpheme. Mglovesfun (talk) 21:17, 11 August 2012 (UTC)

rfv-sense: "(uncountable, usually in combination) Goods or a type of goods offered for sale or use." Am looking forward to seeing unambiguous cites. Mglovesfun (talk) 21:22, 11 August 2012 (UTC)

Really? There are so many instances of [X] ware (and even [X]-ware) for each of the words of the form [X]ware that we have, I'm surprised that you are RfVing it. Try this for bgc hits for "silver ware" limited to works published or reprinted in the 21st century. DCDuring TALK 00:32, 12 August 2012 (UTC)
Sense #1 is in the sense of, for example, "sold his ware" for which phrase there are numerous gbooks hits - example Astbury was the more successful and made frequent journeys to London, where he sold his ware and obtained further orders. Sense #2 (An individual good) does not appear to be citable. SpinningSpark 01:33, 12 August 2012 (UTC)
rfv passed on the sense that I tagged. Mglovesfun (talk) 10:48, 12 August 2012 (UTC)

Noting that it is also applied to metal goods and not just pottery per NYT use of "tole ware" and "damascene ware" etc. More sources on request, of course. Collect (talk) 16:23, 12 August 2012 (UTC)

The first sense has been cited; I've replaced the second with a pointer to "wares". - -sche (discuss) 00:28, 15 October 2012 (UTC)


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