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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aberrāns, present active participle of aberrō (go astray; err), from ab (from) + errō (to wander).[1] See aberr.[2]

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /əˈbɛɹ.n̩t/, /ˈæ.bəɹ.n̩t/
  • (US) IPA(key): /əbˈɛɹ.n̩t/, /ˈæ.bəɹ.n̩t/

AdjectiveEdit

aberrant (comparative more aberrant, superlative most aberrant)

  1. Differing from the norm. [First attested sometime between the mid 16th century and the early 17th century.][3]
  2. (sometimes figuratively) Straying from the right way; deviating from morality or truth. [First attested in the mid 18th century.][3]
  3. (botany, zoology) Deviating from the ordinary or natural type; exceptional; abnormal. [First attested in the mid 19th century.][3]
    • 1859, Charles Darwin, On the Origin of the Species:
      The more aberrant any form is, the greater must have been the number of connecting forms which, on my theory, have been exterminated.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

NounEdit

aberrant (plural aberrants)

  1. A person or object that deviates from the rest of a group.
  2. (biology) A group, individual, or structure that deviates from the usual or natural type, especially with an atypical chromosome number.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Aberrant at Dictionary.com
  2. ^ “aberrant” in the Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, 1974 edition.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 “aberrant” in Lesley Brown, editor-in-chief; William R. Trumble and Angus Stevenson, editors, The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles, 5th edition, Oxford; New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 2002, →ISBN, page 4.

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aberrāns, present active participle of aberrō (go astray; err).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

aberrant (masculine and feminine plural aberrants)

  1. aberrant
  2. (pathology) aberrant (indicating an organ or other tissue which is not in its expected location)

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aberrant-, stem of aberrāns, present active participle of aberrō (go astray; err).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /a.bɛ.ʁɑ̃/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

aberrant (feminine singular aberrante, masculine plural aberrants, feminine plural aberrantes)

  1. aberrant, abnormal or anomalous.
  2. (sciences) Which is impossible according to the norms or rules.

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aberrāns, present active participle of aberrō (go astray; err).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

aberrant (comparative aberranter, superlative am aberrantesten)

  1. aberrant

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

aberrant

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of aberrō