acclamation

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

acclamation (countable and uncountable, plural acclamations)

  1. A shout of approbation, favor, or assent; eager expression of approval; loud applause.
    • 1876, Henry Martyn Robert, Robert’s Rules of Order, Chicago: S.C. Griggs & Co., p. 100, Article IX, Section 46, note,[1]
      Sometimes a member nominates a chairman and no vote is taken, the assembly signifying their approval by acclamation.
    • 1829, Robert Southey, Sir Thomas More; or, Colloquies on the Progress and Prospects of Society
      On such a day, a holiday having been voted by acclamation, an ordinary walk would not satisfy the children.
  2. The act of winning an election to a post because there were no other candidates.
    With no one running against her, she won by acclamation.
  3. (art) A representation, in sculpture or on medals, of people expressing joy.
    • 1826, James Elmes, A General and Bibliographical Dictionary of the Fine Arts
      The medals on which laudatory acclamations are recorded are called by antiquaries acclamation medals.
  4. (politics) An oral vote taken without formal ballot and with much fanfare; typically an overwhelmingly affirmative vote.

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin acclāmātiō, acclāmātiōnem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

acclamation f (plural acclamations)

  1. acclamation

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit