See also: acra-

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek ἀ̆κρᾰ (akra), probably back-formed from German Akren as this is more easily encountered and even the English is most likely found in books written by Germans.

NounEdit

acra pl (plural only)

  1. (anatomy, rare) The vascular areas of the body most removed from the heart
    • 2004 January 8, Barnhill, Raymond L.; Piepkorn, Michael; Busam, Klaus J., Pathology of Melanocytic Nevi and Malignant Melanoma, Springer Science & Business Media, →ISBN, page 89:
      The principal differential diagnostic considerations in the case of nevi situated at the acra are atypical nevus and melanoma and, occasionally Spitz nevus/tumor.
    • 2014 July 29, Ückert, Sandra, Cold Application in Training & Competition: The Influence of Temperature on Your Athletic Performance, Meyer & Meyer Verlag, →ISBN, page 52:
      The surface area to volume ratio requires that the surface temperature in the nearly cylinder-shaped body parts should be lower the smaller their radius is. Consequently skin temperatures drop toward the ends of the extremities. A quicker cooling of the acra compared to head or trunk also occurs.

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Probably borrowed from English acre, otherwise from Old Norse akr; either way from Proto-Germanic *akraz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éǵros.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

acra m (genitive singular acra, nominative plural acraí)

  1. acre
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

acra m (genitive singular acra, nominative plural acraí)

  1. tool, implement
  2. service, convenience
DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
acra n-acra hacra t-acra
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit