affix

See also: Affix

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Old French affixer or Medieval Latin (1533) affixare, frequentative of Latin affigere (past participle affixus), from ad- + figere.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

affix (plural affixes)

  1. That which is affixed; an appendage.
  2. (linguistics) A bound morpheme added to a word’s stem; formerly applied only to suffixes (also called postfixes), the term as now used comprises prefixes, suffixes, infixes, circumfixes, and suprafixes.
  3. (mathematics) The complex number a+bi associated to the point in the Gauss Plane with coordinates (a,b).

AntonymsEdit

  • (linguistics: bound morpheme added to a word’s stem): nonaffix

HyponymsEdit

Coordinate termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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VerbEdit

affix (third-person singular simple present affixes, present participle affixing, simple past and past participle affixed)

  1. To attach.
    • Ray
      Should they [caterpillars] affix them to the leaves of a plant improper for their food []
    to affix a stigma to a person; to affix ridicule or blame to somebody
  2. To subjoin, annex, or add at the close or end; to append to.
    to affix a syllable to a word; to affix a seal to an instrument; to affix one's name to a writing
  3. To fix or fasten figuratively; with on or upon.
    eyes affixed upon the ground
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)

TranslationsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin (1533) affixare, frequentative of Latin affigere (past participle affixus), from ad- + figere.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

affix n (plural affixen, diminutive affixje n)

  1. Affix (linguistics and mathematics)

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

affix n

  1. an affix

DeclensionEdit

Last modified on 6 April 2014, at 08:53