affront

See also: Affront

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English afrounten, from Old French afronter (to defy), from Vulgar Latin *affrontare (to hit in the face), from Latin ad (to) + frons (forehead).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

affront (third-person singular simple present affronts, present participle affronting, simple past and past participle affronted)

  1. To insult intentionally, especially openly.
    • Addison
      How can anyone imagine that the fathers would have dared to affront the wife of Aurelius?
  2. To meet defiantly; to confront.
    to affront death
    • 1978, Lawrence Durrell, Livia, Faber & Faber 1992 (Avignon Quintet), p. 436:
      Avignon was beginning to settle down for the night – that long painful stretch of time which must somehow be affronted.
  3. (obsolete) To meet or encounter face to face.
    • Holland
      All the sea-coasts do affront the Levant.
    • Shakespeare
      That he, as 'twere by accident, may here / Affront Ophelia.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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NounEdit

affront (plural affronts)

  1. An open or intentional offense, slight, or insult.
    Such behavior is an affront to society.
  2. (obsolete) A hostile encounter or meeting.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

from Old French afront

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

affront m (plural affronts)

  1. affront, insult, snub

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

Last modified on 12 April 2014, at 19:32