See also: aforé, afore-, and a-fore

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English afore, aforn, from Old English onforan or ætforan; equivalent to a- +‎ fore.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

afore (not comparable)

  1. (archaic, dialect) Before.
    • 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, “The Tempest”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act II, scene ii]:
      Stephano: He's in his fit now ; and doe's not talke after the wiſeſt ; hee ſhall taſte of my Bottle : if hee haue neuer drunke wine afore, it will goe neere to remoue his Fit : []
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      A chap named Eleazir Kendrick and I had chummed in together the summer afore and built a fish-weir and shanty at Setuckit Point, down Orham way. For a spell we done pretty well.
  2. (nautical) In the fore part of a ship.

PrepositionEdit

afore

  1. Before; in advance of the time of.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      He said he was jealous, and craved something to ease his care. 'It's but a small thing I ask,' says he, 'but it will make me a happy man, and nothing ever shall come atween us. Tryst wi' me for Beltane's E'en on the Sker sands, at the green link o' the burn where the sands begin, on the ebb o' the tide when midnight is by, but afore cockcrow. For,' said he, 'that was our forbears' tryst for true lovers, and wherefore no for you and me?'
    • 1989, Edward Chisnall, Bell in the tree; The Glasgow story:
      "Oh aye!" his face lit up with a smile. "I mind that! Where was that?" "That was us when we all worked in the shop, afore the War." "Oh aye …?" he frowned. "Who …?" She took the photograph back from him and reached inside her apron pocket for her spectacles.
  2. Before; situated geographically or metaphorically in front of.

ConjunctionEdit

afore

  1. In advance of the time when; before.

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English onforan or ætforan; equivalent to a- +‎ fore.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

afore

  1. before; afore

PrepositionEdit

afore

  1. before; afore: in advance of the time of
    • c. 1370–1450, Laurence de Premierfait, Des cas des nobles hommes et femmes, as quoted in Lydgate's Fall of Princes (1923, The Carnegie Institution of Washington):
      Affor tyme thei wer but bestiall,
      Till thei to resoun be lawes wer constreyned,
      Vndir discrecioun bi statutis naturall
  2. before; afore: situated geographically or metaphorically in front of
    • 1399, Rich. Redeless IV, 72
      and somme were so ffers
      at ffrist come,
      that they bente on a bonet,
      and bare a topte saile
      affor the wynde ffresshely,
      to make a good ffare

ConjunctionEdit

afore

  1. before; afore: in advance of the time when

DescendantsEdit

  • English: afore
  • Scots: afore

ReferencesEdit


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English afore. More at English afore.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

afore (not comparable)

  1. (of place) before, in front
  2. (of time) before, previously, in advance

PrepositionEdit

afore

  1. (of place) before, in front of
  2. (of time) before

ConjunctionEdit

afore

  1. (of place) before, rather than

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

afore

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of aforar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of aforar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of aforar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of aforar.