airborne

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Attested since the 1640s; air +‎ -borne

AdjectiveEdit

airborne (not comparable)

  1. In or carried by the air.
    Airborne pollen can aggravate allergies.
    • 2012 December 1, “An internet of airborne things”, in The Economist[1], volume 405, number 8813, page 3 (Technology Quarterly):
      A farmer could place an order for a new tractor part by text message and pay for it by mobile money-transfer. A supplier many miles away would then take the part to the local matternet station for airborne dispatch via drone.
  2. In flight.
    • 1984, Steve Harris, "Aces High", Iron Maiden, Powerslave.
      There goes the siren that warns of the air raid / Then comes the sound of the guns sending flak / Out for the scramble we've got to get airborne / Got to get up for the coming attack.
  3. Fitted to an aircraft.
    airborne radar
  4. Transported by air in an aircraft.
    airborne troops

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

airborne (plural airbornes or airborne)

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
  1. Military infantry intended to be transported by air and delivered to the battlefield by parachute or helicopter.

ReferencesEdit

  • airborne” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2021.