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See also: Aland, Áland, Alánd, and Åland

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English aland, alond, alonde, o lande, from Old English on lande (on land), equivalent to a- +‎ land.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

aland (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) On dry land, as opposed to in the water. [13th-19th c.]
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, Pericles, V:
      I maruell how the Fishes liue in the Sea [] Why, as Men doe a-land.
  2. (now rare, poetic) To the land; ashore. [from 14th c.]
    • c. 1541, The Chronicle of Calais, London 1846:
      Henry the Eighth [] departed out of England from Sowthampton, with a great navy of shipps to set that company aland in Spayne, for to helpe the kynge of Spayne agaynste the Frenche kynge []

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


KurdishEdit

Old FrisianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

āland n

  1. island

InflectionEdit