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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ala (wing) + -ar (adjectival suffix).

AdjectiveEdit

alar (not comparable)

  1. (anatomy) of or relating to the armpit; axillary.
  2. Having, resembling, or composed of wings or alae.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AnagramsEdit


Franco-ProvençalEdit

EtymologyEdit

The all- forms derive from Vulgar Latin alare (attested in the 7th century Reichenau Glosses). This verb, a cognate of French aller and Friulian , has traditionally been explained as deriving from Latin ambulāre via or together with amblar (compare Old French ambler, Italian ambiare, Romanian umbla), but this explanation is phonologically problematic. Several theories have been put forth since the 17th century to explain how ambulare could have become alar in Franco-Provençal and aller in French.[1] Since at least the 18th century, some have suggested that French aller, and thus Franco-Provençal alar as well, derive not from Latin but from Celtic,[2][3] Gaulish *aliu, from Proto-Celtic zero grade *ɸal-: compare Welsh elwyf (I may go), Cornish ellev (I may go), from full grade *ɸel- (see mynd for more). See French aller (to go).

Latin vādō (go) supplies the present tense forms and īre, present active infinitive of , supplies the future and conditional.

VerbEdit

alar

  1. to go

ConjugationEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 1939, D. A. Paton, On the origin of aller, in Studies in French Language and Mediaeval Literature, page 301: The opinion that ambulare is the origin of aller has been and is held by so many eminent etymologists that it is with some diffidence I venture to suggest another source. [...] By these suggestions I am not attempting to prove that aller and ambler are of different origin, but only to show that such a theory is not only possible, but probable. The real and to my mind insuperable objection to ambulare as the source of aller is the phonetic question, and here we find that the supporters of ambulare, in explaining its unique development, arrive at their common conclusion by entirely different routes. Ducange would take aller as coming from ambler. Schuchardt's reasoning is as follows: – ambulare to *ammulare to *amlare to aller. [...] More recently, Meyer-Lübke's view is that ambulare was simply contracted to *allare, the contraction being particularly natural in the imperative mood. Gammillscheg also points out that ambulate, used in the army as a word of command, would easily be shortened to *alate.
  2. ^ 1773, Charles Vallancey, A Grammar of the Iberno-Celtic, Or Irish Language, page 84: aill, go thou [...] from hence aller the French verb, to go
  3. ^ 1873, Louis A. Languellier, H. M. Monsanto, A pratical course with the French language, page 487: "words which [...] belong to the ancient Gallic or Celtic speech [...include] aller, to go"

LatinEdit

Old IrishEdit

VerbEdit

·alar

  1. singular present indicative passive conjunct of ailid

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
·alar unchanged ·n-alar
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

ala +‎ -ar.

AdjectiveEdit

alar m or f (plural alares, comparable)

  1. alar (relating to wings)

Etymology 2Edit

From ala + -ar.

VerbEdit

alar (first-person singular present indicative alo, past participle alado)

  1. to give wings
ConjugationEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Italian alare, from French haler.

VerbEdit

alar (first-person singular present indicative alo, past participle alado)

  1. to haul
ConjugationEdit
Derived termsEdit

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

ala (wing) +‎ -ar

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

alar (plural alares)

  1. alar (having or resembling wings)

NounEdit

alar m (plural alares)

  1. eaves
    Synonym: alero

Further readingEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

alar

  1. indefinite plural of al