See also: ālp-, Alp, ALP, and Ālp

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Back-formation from alps pl, from Latin alpes (high mountains, especially those of Switzerland), of Celtic or Germanic origin (compare Old Saxon elbon (Alps), Old High German Alpūn (Alps); Old High German alba (alp, mountain)), probably from Proto-Indo-European *albʰós (white).

NounEdit

alp (plural alps)

  1. A very high mountain. Specifically, one of the Alps, the highest chain of mountains in Europe.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • Alp (superseded)

EtymologyEdit

Back-formation from Alpen.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɑlp/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: alp
  • Rhymes: -ɑlp

NounEdit

alp m (plural alpen, diminutive alpje n)

  1. alp, (very) high mountain

Related termsEdit


FrenchEdit

PhraseEdit

alp

  1. (Internet slang, text messaging) à la prochaine

IrishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Compare English alp.

NounEdit

alp m (genitive singular ailp, nominative plural alpa)

  1. alp (high mountain)
DeclensionEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

VerbEdit

alp (present analytic alpann, future analytic alpfaidh, verbal noun alpadh, past participle alptha)

  1. (transitive) devour, swallow whole
  2. (transitive) grab
ConjugationEdit
Derived termsEdit
  • alpach, alpúil (voracious, greedy; grabbing, adjective)
  • alpaire m (voracious eater; grabber)
Related termsEdit
  • alpaireacht f ((act of) bolting food; voracious eating; (act of) grabbing)
  • alpartha (greedy; stout, burly, adjective)

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

alp f (genitive singular ailpe, nominative plural ailpeanna)

  1. Alternative form of ailp (lump, chunk; knob)
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

alp m (genitive singular ailp, nominative plural alpa)

  1. Alternative form of earc (lizard; reptile)
DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
alp n-alp halp t-alp
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


Middle High GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (elf, spirit): alb

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German alp (13th century), from Proto-Germanic *albiz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *albʰós.

NounEdit

alp m (plural elbe or elber)

  1. elf
  2. friendly spirit, ghostly being, genius, or fairy
  3. nightmare (later meaning)

DescendantsEdit

  • German: Alb

ReferencesEdit

  • Marshall Jones Company (1930). Mythology of All Races Series, Volume 2 Eddic, Great Britain: Marshall Jones Company, 1930, pp. 220.

Scottish GaelicEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly from Old Irish alp (lump, loose mass).

NounEdit

alp f (genitive singular ailp, plural alpa)

  1. protuberance, eminence
  2. mountain

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
alp n-alp h-alp t-alp
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French Alpes (Alps)

NounEdit

alp c

  1. alp; a mountain in the Alps

DeclensionEdit

Declension of alp 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative alp alpen alper alperna
Genitive alps alpens alpers alpernas

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Turkic *ălp (difficult, hard; warrior, hero, brave; giant, landlord).[1] Cognate with Old Turkic 𐰞𐰯(l¹p /alp/).

AdjectiveEdit

alp (comparative daha alp, superlative en alp)

  1. brave, hero

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Starostin, Sergei; Dybo, Anna; Mudrak, Oleg, “*ălpa”, in Etymological dictionary of the Altaic languages (Handbuch der Orientalistik; VIII.8)‎[1], Leiden, New York, Köln: E.J. Brill, 2003