alterative

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin alterativum, noun use of alterativus.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɒl.tɹə.tɪv/, /ˈɒl.tə.ɹə.tɪv/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɔl.tɚˌaɪ.tɪv/, /ˈɔl.tɚ.ə.tɪv/

NounEdit

alterative (plural alteratives)

  1. (medicine, now historical) A medicine or treatment which works by changing processes within the body, rather than by evacuating something etc. [from 14th c.]
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970, partition II, section 5, member 1, subsection v:
      Amongst this number of cordials and alteratives I do not find a more present remedy than a cup of wine or strong drink, if it be soberly and opportunely used.

AdjectiveEdit

alterative (comparative more alterative, superlative most alterative)

  1. Causing alteration.
    1. (medicine) Gradually changing, or tending to change, a morbid state into a healthy one. [from 15th c.]

TranslationsEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

alterative f

  1. feminine plural of alterativo

AnagramsEdit