English

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Etymology

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amend +‎ -er

Pronunciation

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Noun

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amender (plural amenders)

  1. One who amends.

Translations

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Anagrams

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French

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Etymology

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From Old French amender, from Latin ēmendāre (to free from faults, correct, improve, remedy, amend, revise, cure), from ex (from, out of) + mendum (fault).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /a.mɑ̃.de/
  • Audio:(file)

Verb

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amender

  1. (transitive) to amend
  2. (transitive) to improve (e.g. land, conduct)
  3. (transitive, figuratively) to mend (one's ways), reform

Conjugation

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Derived terms

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Further reading

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Anagrams

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Middle French

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Etymology

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Old French amender < Latin ēmendō.

Verb

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amender

  1. to improve
  2. to fine (impose a financial penalty upon)

Descendants

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  • French: amender

References

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  • amender on Dictionnaire du Moyen Français (1330–1500) (in French)

Norman

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Etymology

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From Old French amender, from Latin ēmendō, ēmendāre (free from faults, correct, improve, remedy, amend, revise, cure), from ex (from, out of) + mendum (fault).

Pronunciation

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Verb

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amender

  1. (Jersey) to improve

Old French

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Etymology

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Latin ēmendāre, present active infinitive of ēmendō (I free from faults, correct, improve, remedy, amend, revise, cure). The prefixes a- and es- are often used interchangeably in Old French.

Verb

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amender

  1. to correct; to set right
  2. to fix; to repair
  3. (of an illness, etc.) to cure

Conjugation

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This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-d, *-ds, *-dt are modified to t, z, t. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.