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GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese enojar, nojar (13th century), from Old French or Old Occitan, from Vulgar Latin inodiāre (to make hateful), from Latin odium (hatred). Cognate with Portuguese enojar, Spanish enojar, Italian annoiare, French ennuyer and English annoy.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

anoxar (first-person singular present anoxo, first-person singular preterite anoxei, past participle anoxado)

  1. (transitive) to cause disgust; to nauseate
  2. (transitive) to annoy; to disgust
    • 1370, Ramón Lorenzo (ed.), Crónica troiana. A Coruña: Fundación Barrié, page 519:
      Tanto que fuy manãa, fezo o sol muy claro et muy bõo, et despois cõmeçou d'escureçer et de chouer et uentar muyto, et todos andauã mollados et anoiados
      As soon as it dawned it was sunny and clear, but then it darkened and it rained and the wind blew strongly, and everyone was wet and annoyed
    Synonyms: aborrecer, enfastiar, repugnar
  3. (takes a reflexive pronoun) to anger, to irritate
    Synonyms: enfadar, incomodar

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • anojar” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • anoi” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • anoj” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • anoxar” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • anoxar” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • anoxar” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.