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See also: ANSA and anså

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ansa (handle).

NounEdit

ansa (plural ansae)

  1. (astronomy) the most protruding part of planetary rings as seen from distance

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FinnishEdit

(index an)

EtymologyEdit

From a Baltic language. Compare to Old Prussian ansis (“hook, latch”) and Latvian osa.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ansa

  1. A trap
  2. A booby trap

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of ansa (Kotus type 9/kala, no gradation)
nominative ansa ansat
genitive ansan ansojen
partitive ansaa ansoja
illative ansaan ansoihin
singular plural
nominative ansa ansat
accusative nom. ansa ansat
gen. ansan
genitive ansan ansojen
ansainrare
partitive ansaa ansoja
inessive ansassa ansoissa
elative ansasta ansoista
illative ansaan ansoihin
adessive ansalla ansoilla
ablative ansalta ansoilta
allative ansalle ansoille
essive ansana ansoina
translative ansaksi ansoiksi
instructive ansoin
abessive ansatta ansoitta
comitative ansoineen

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ansa

  1. third-person singular past historic of anser

AnagramsEdit


IbanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Malay angsa, from Sanskrit हंस (haṃsá), from Proto-Indo-Iranian, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰans-.

NounEdit

ansa

  1. goose (a grazing waterfowl of the family Anatidae)

IcelandicEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Once written as anza, but then changed into ansa when the letter 'z' was eliminated from Icelandic. From anz (answer) and -a (turns nouns into verbs). Literally meaning "to answer".

VerbEdit

ansa (weak verb, third-person singular past indicative ansaði, supine ansað)

  1. to answer, to reply syn.

ConjugationEdit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

SynonymsEdit


IrishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

AdjectiveEdit

ansa

  1. dearest, most beloved

Etymology 2Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

AdjectiveEdit

ansa

  1. (literary) difficult

Etymology 3Edit

From Latin ansa (handle).

NounEdit

ansa m (genitive singular ansa, nominative plural ansaí)

  1. (astronomy) ansa
DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
ansa n-ansa hansa t-ansa
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

  • "ansa" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “ansa” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “ansa” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Directly from Latin ansa.

NounEdit

ansa f (plural anse)

  1. handle
  2. curve or bend (in a river)
  3. loop, coil

VerbEdit

ansa

  1. third-person singular present indicative of ansare
  2. second-person singular imperative of ansare

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *h₂emseh₂ (handle)[1], from *h₂em- (to grasp). See also amplus and ampla (handle).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ānsa f (genitive ānsae); first declension

  1. handle
  2. tiller (handle of the rudder)

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative ānsa ānsae
genitive ānsae ānsārum
dative ānsae ānsīs
accusative ānsam ānsās
ablative ānsā ānsīs
vocative ānsa ānsae

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Mallory, Adams, Encyclopedia of Indo-European Culture, p.255

Further readingEdit

  • ansa in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ansa in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “ansa”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • ansa” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to give occasion for blame; to challenge criticism: ansas dare ad reprehendum, reprehensionis
    • to contain, afford matter for criticism: ansam habere reprehensionis
  • ansa in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, ISBN 0195083458
  • Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), Bern, München: Francke Verlag

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • anse (e infinitive)

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse ansa, anza.

VerbEdit

ansa (present tense ansar, past tense ansa, past participle ansa, passive infinitive ansast, present participle ansande, imperative ans/ansa)

  1. notice, pay attention to
    Eg ansa deg ikkje.
    I didn't notice you.

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


SwedishEdit

VerbEdit

ansa (present ansar, preterite ansade, supine ansat, imperative ansa)

  1. to prune (to trim a tree or shrub)

ConjugationEdit



Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English answer.

NounEdit

ansa

  1. answer