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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin antidotum, from Ancient Greek ἀντίδοτον (antídoton), neuter of ἀντίδοτος (antídotos, given as a remedy for), from ἀντιδίδωμι (antidídōmi, I give in return, repay), from ἀντί (antí, against) + δίδωμι (dídōmi, I give). Compare French antidote.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 
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antidote (plural antidotes)

  1. A remedy to counteract the effects of poison (often followed by "against," "for," or "to").
    She reached the hospital in time to receive the antidote for the snake venom.
    • 2014 December 23, Olivia Judson, “The hemiparasite season [print version: Under the hemiparasite, International New York Times, 24–25 December 2014, p. 7]”, in The New York Times[1]:
      The druids [] believed that mistletoe could make barren animals fecund, and that it was an antidote to all poisons.
  2. (figuratively) Something that counteracts or prevents something harmful.
    We need an antidote for this misinformation.

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VerbEdit

antidote (third-person singular simple present antidotes, present participle antidoting, simple past and past participle antidoted)

  1. (transitive) To counteract as an antidote.
    • 2007, Suzanne C. Lawton, Judyth Reichenberg-Ullman, Asperger syndrome: natural steps toward a better life (page 143)
      For his part, the patient must avoid some commonplace substances in order to avoid antidoting or stopping the action of the homeopathic remedy []

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin antidotum.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɑ̃.ti.dɔt/
  • (file)

NounEdit

antidote m (plural antidotes)

  1. antidote

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