approve

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English aproven, appreoven, appreven, apreven, borrowed from Old French aprover, approver, approuvir, appreuver (to approve), from Latin approbō, from ad + probō (to esteem as good, approve, prove). Compare prove, approbate.

VerbEdit

approve (third-person singular simple present approves, present participle approving, simple past and past participle approved)

  1. (transitive) To sanction officially; to ratify; to confirm; to set as satisfactory.
    • 2013 August 10, “Can China clean up fast enough?”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8848:
      It has jailed environmental activists and is planning to limit the power of judicial oversight by handing a state-approved body a monopoly over bringing environmental lawsuits.
    Although we may disagree with it, we must nevertheless approve the sentence handed down by the court-martial.
  2. (transitive) To regard as good; to commend; to be pleased with; to think well of.
    We approve the measure of the administration, for it is an excellent decision.
  3. (transitive, archaic) To make proof of; to demonstrate; to prove or show practically.
  4. (intransitive, followed by "of") To consider worthy (to); to be pleased (with); to accept.
    Her mother never approves of any of her boyfriends. She thinks nobody is good enough for her little girl.
    • 2016, Mitski, Your Best American Girl
      Your mother wouldn't approve of how my mother raised me. But I do, I think I do. And you're an all-American boy
    • 1995, The Verve, A Northern Soul
      Dad didn't approve of me, do you? I'm alive with something inside of me.
    • 1848, Thomas Babington Macaulay, The History of England from the Accession Of James II
      They had not approved of the deposition of James.
    • 1758, Jonathan Swift, The History of the Four Last Years of the Queen
      Their address was in the most dutiful manner, approving of what her majesty had done toward a peace, and dissolve her parliament
  5. (archaic, transitive) To show to be worthy; to demonstrate the merits of.
    • a. 1729, John Rogers, The Duty and Advantageous of Trust in God
      The first care and concern must be to approve himself to God.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English approuen, approven, from Old French aprouer; a- + a form apparently derived from the pro, prod, in Latin prōsum (be useful or profitable). Compare with improve.

VerbEdit

approve (third-person singular simple present approves, present participle approving, simple past and past participle approved)

  1. (transitive, law, English law) To make profit of; to convert to one's own profit — said especially of waste or common land appropriated by the lord of the manor.

ReferencesEdit