Old Irish

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Etymology

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From ar- +‎ ceilid (to hide). The verb became weak (and gained delenited ll in various prototonic forms) due to the influence of the unrelated verbs like do·airchella (to encompass) and do·ella (to take away, steal).

Pronunciation

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Verb

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ar·cela (verbal noun airchellad)

  1. to take away, steal
    Synonym: gataid
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 9c23
      .i. ar·celith ar chách et di·oiprid chách.
      You take away from everyone, and you defraud everyone.
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 26b19
      .i. aras·celatais ar écin do fomair [fomair is an unintelligible hapax] doib inna bochtu ⁊ inna dommu.
      They used to seize them by force to [serve???] the poor and needy.
    • c. 845, St Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 202b7
      .i. as mmé m'oínur arid·rochell, ar mad ego nammá as·berad, bes nobed nach aile leis oc in(n)d airchellad amal ṡodain.
      i.e. that it was me alone who took it away, since if only ego was said, perhaps there could have been another person with him at the taking-away in that case.

Inflection

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Descendants

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  • Middle Irish: ar·cela

Mutation

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Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
ar·cela ar·chela ar·cela
pronounced with /-ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading

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