See also: àrid and árið

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French aride or directly from Latin āridus (dry, arid, parched),[1] confer its synonymous contracted form ardus. Originally from the verb āreo (I am dry, I am parched), akin to ārdeō (I am on fire, I burn).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

arid (comparative arider or more arid, superlative aridest or most arid)

  1. Very dry.
    Antonyms: wet, drenched, damp, moist
    The cake was arid.
  2. Describing a very dry climate. Typically defined as less than 25 cm or 10 inches of rainfall annually.
    Antonyms: rainforest, humid
    Deserts are known for being arid.
  3. (figurative) Devoid of value.
    Antonyms: valuable, costly, precious
    The millionaire viewed his gift as arid.
    • 1956, Arthur C. Clarke, The City and the Stars, page 37:
      Such occupations might have seemed arid to those who did not possess the intellect to appreciate their subtleties.

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GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /aˈʁiːt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: arid

AdjectiveEdit

arid (comparative arider, superlative am aridesten)

  1. arid

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • arid in Duden online