EnglishEdit

AdverbEdit

at school ‎(not comparable)

  1. At one's school.
    Melanie can't come on Monday, because she will be at school.
    I left my history book at school.
    • 1654, Samuel Clarke, The marrow of ecclesiastical history[1]:
      Laurence Humfreid was born in the County of Buckingham, and Brought up, first at School, and then sent to Oxford, where he was admitted into the Colledge of Mary Magdalen, and followed his studies hard all the daies of King Edward the sixth.
    • 1769, Eleazar Wheelock, A Continuation of the Narrative of the Indian Charity-school[2]:
      [] and at length got a Promise, and shall, I think, have these six at School as soon as Hunting-season (now commencing) is at an End; and there is a Prospect of our having the Schools at both Places attended as commonly as any Schools in New-England are.
    • 1831, Allison Wrifford, Essays on School Keeping[3]:
      [] but nothing of this sort should ever be considered as a part of the serious business of instruction, or admitted as an exercise at school.
    • 1999, Ghazala Bhatti, Asian Children at Home and at School: An Ethnographic Study[4]:
      Mac an Ghaill's (1988) study focused on the theme of 'resistance within accommodation' which was how some Asian and African Caribbean young people in his sample reacted to their experiences of racism at school and college.

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