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See also: Augur

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Borrowed from Latin augur, of uncertain origin; akin to augurō (interpret omens).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

augur (plural augurs)

  1. A diviner who foretells events by the behaviour of birds or other animals, or by signs derived from celestial phenomena, or unusual occurrences.
    • Dryden
      Augur of ill, whose tongue was never found / Without a priestly curse or boding sound.
  2. (Ancient Rome) An official who interpreted omens before the start of public events.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

augur (third-person singular simple present augurs, present participle auguring, simple past and past participle augured)

  1. To foretell events; to exhibit signs of future events.
  2. To anticipate, to foretell, or to indicate a favorable or an unfavorable issue.
    to augur well or ill

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of uncertain origin. Two possibilities are:

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

augur m, f (genitive auguris); third declension

  1. augur

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative augur augurēs
Genitive auguris augurum
Dative augurī auguribus
Accusative augurem augurēs
Ablative augure auguribus
Vocative augur augurēs

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • augur in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • augur in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • augur in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • augur in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • augur in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • augur in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  1. ^ Lewis, Charlton T., Elementary Latin Dictionary, Oxford, 1890.
  2. ^ Simpson, D.P., Cassell's New Latin Dictionary, Funk & Wagnall's, 1959.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Latin augur

NounEdit

augur m (definite singular auguren, indefinite plural augurer, definite plural augurene)

  1. (historical) an augur, see English augur for more.
  2. (informal) a chief, bigwig

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin augur

NounEdit

augur m (definite singular auguren, indefinite plural augurar, definite plural augurane)

  1. (historical) an augur, see English augur for more.
  2. (informal) a chief, bigwig

ReferencesEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French augure, from Latin augur, augurium.

NounEdit

augur m (plural auguri)

  1. augur, auspex

NounEdit

augur n (uncountable)

  1. augury, omen

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

augur m (plural augures)

  1. augur