English

edit
  A user has added this entry to requests for verification(+)
If it cannot be verified that this term meets our attestation criteria, it will be deleted. Feel free to edit this entry as normal, but do not remove {{rfv}} until the request has been resolved.

Alternative forms

edit

Etymology

edit

UK 16th century. Possibly borrowed from Yiddish אַ (a, indefinite article) + טומאה (tume, church (derogatory); forbidden; impure).

Noun

edit

autem (plural autems)

  1. (obsolete, UK, thieves' cant) A church. [16th–18th c.]
    • 1566, Thomas Harman, A Caveat or Warning for Common Cursetors[1], page 49; republished 1814:
      THESE Autem Mortes be maried wemen, as there be but a fewe: For Autem in their language is a Church, so shee is a wyfe maried at the church, and they be as chaste as a cowe: I haue yt gooeth to bull euery moone, with what bull she careth not.
    • 1610, Samuel Rowlands, Martin Mark-All, Beadle of Bridewell; His defence and the Anſwere to the Belman of London.[2]:
      As ſoone as euer the pꝛoclamation was ended, Loꝛd, what a Companie of petitioners pꝛeſſed to the barre to pꝛeferre their papers of iniuries, that were offred and done among themſelues, here one complaines that hee could not trauell ſafely, noꝛ cary any money without danger of the vpꝛight man and Tinker, but that they would robbe and ſpoyle them of all that was ought about them, here another that they could not quietly take their reſt in the night, noꝛ keepe his Autem, oꝛ doxie ſole vnto himſelfe: but that the Ruffler, padder, oꝛ any vpright man, would take them away perfoꝛce, and others that they could not conuerſe, and keepe company with thoſe that they met, but that in the night they are ſure to be Clyd in the night, by the Angler, oꝛ hooker, oꝛ ſuch like pilferers that liue vpon the ſpoyle of other pooꝛe people.
    • 1714, Alexander Smith, The History of the Lives Of the moſt Noted Highway-men, [] [3], 2nd edition:
      [] but in the mean Time he taught his Pupil a deal of canting Words, telling him Autem was Arabick for a Church; []
    • 1823, Jon Bee, Sportsman's Slang; a New Dictionary of the terms used in the affairs of the Turf, the Ring, the Chase, and the Cock-pit; with those of Bon-ton, and the Varieties of Life; [] [4]:
      Come, I say, who’s a going-out? Autem is over []
    • 1837, W. Harrison Ainsworth, Rookwood[5], revised edition, page 246:
      Vell, vell, a few minutes will settle that. Come, pals, to the autem ken. Avay. Mind and obey orders.

Derived terms

edit

Adjective

edit

autem (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete, UK, thieves' cant) Married.
    Synonyms: wed, wedded

Derived terms

edit

References

edit

Czech

edit

Noun

edit

autem

  1. instrumental singular of auto

Latin

edit

Alternative forms

edit
  • aũt (scribal abbreviation)

Etymology

edit

Same source as aut.

Pronunciation

edit

Conjunction

edit

autem

  1. but
    Synonyms: at, ast, tamen, sed
  2. while, however
  3. moreover, and, also
  4. on the other hand, on the contrary, whereas
    • bad argument #1 to 'lc' (string expected, got nil)

Synonyms

edit

References

edit
  • autem”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • autem”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • autem in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.

Polish

edit

Pronunciation

edit
  • IPA(key): /ˈaw.tɛm/
  • Audio:(file)
  • Rhymes: -awtɛm
  • Syllabification: au‧tem

Noun

edit

autem

  1. instrumental singular of auto