EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

UK 16th century. Possibly borrowed from Yiddish אַ(a, indefinite article) + טומאה(tume, church (derogatory); forbidden; impure).

NounEdit

autem (plural autems)

  1. (obsolete, Britain, thieves' cant) a church [16th-18th c.]

Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

autem (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete, Britain, thieves' cant) Married.
    Synonyms: wed, wedded

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • [Francis Grose] (1788), “Autem”, in A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, 2nd corrected and enlarged edition, London: Printed for S. Hooper, [], OCLC 3138643.
  • “autem” in Albert Barrère and Charles G[odfrey] Leland, compilers and editors, A Dictionary of Slang, Jargon & Cant, volume I (A–K), Edinburgh: The Ballantyne Press, 1889–1890, pages 53–54.
  • Farmer, John Stephen (1890) Slang and Its Analogues[1], volume 1, pages 79–80
  • Eric Partridge, The Routledge Dictionary of Historical Slang. Routledge, 1973. →ISBN.

CzechEdit

NounEdit

autem

  1. instrumental singular of auto

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Same source as aut.

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

autem

  1. but
  2. while, however
  3. moreover, and, also
  4. on the other hand, on the contrary, whereas
    • c. 200 BCE – 190 BCE, Plautus, Captivi :
      Aristophontes: Quid tu autem? Etiam huic credis?
      Hegio: Quid ego credam huic?
      Aristophontes: Insanum esse me?
      Aristophontes: How’s this? You, too? Do you actually believe him?
      Hegio: Believe him in what?
      Aristophontes: That I’m insane?

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

NounEdit

autem

  1. instrumental singular of auto