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EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English bageard (marked by a badge), from bage (badge), referring to the animal's badge-like white blaze, equivalent to badge +‎ -ard.

NounEdit

badger (plural badgers)

  1. Any mammal of three subfamilies, which belong to the family Mustelidae: Melinae (Eurasian badgers), Mellivorinae (ratel or honey badger), and Taxideinae (American badger).
  2. A native or resident of the American state, Wisconsin.
  3. (obsolete) A brush made of badger hair.
  4. (in the plural, obsolete, vulgar, cant) A crew of desperate villains who robbed near rivers, into which they threw the bodies of those they murdered.
SynonymsEdit
HolonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Terms derived from badger (noun)
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

VerbEdit

badger (third-person singular simple present badgers, present participle badgering, simple past and past participle badgered)

  1. To pester, to annoy persistently.
    He kept badgering her about her bad habits.
  2. (Britain, informal) To pass gas; to fart.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Unknown (Possibly from "bagger". "Baggier" is cited by the OED in 1467-8)

NounEdit

badger (plural badgers)

  1. (obsolete) An itinerant licensed dealer in commodities used for food; a hawker; a huckster; -- formerly applied especially to one who bought grain in one place and sold it in another.
See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English badge.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

badger

  1. to use an identity badge
    Avant de quitter la pièce, il ne faudra pas oublier de badger.

ConjugationEdit

This is a regular -er verb, but the stem is written badge- before endings that begin with -a- or -o- (to indicate that the -g- is a “soft” /ʒ/ and not a “hard” /ɡ/). This spelling-change occurs in all verbs in -ger, such as neiger and manger.