EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: băgz, IPA(key): /bæɡz/, /bæːɡz/
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

bags

  1. plural of bag
  2. (often in the phrase 'bags of') A large quantity.
    No need to rush, there's bags of time.
    Please take as many coat hangers as you like. I've got bags.
  3. (slang) Loose-fitting trousers.

VerbEdit

bags

  1. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of bag

Etymology 2Edit

Grammatical extension of third-person singular form of bag (make first claim on something).

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

bags (third-person singular simple present bagses, present participle bagsing, simple past and past participle bagsed)

  1. (Australia, New Zealand, Ireland) To reserve for oneself.
    • 2006, Jill Golden, Inventing Beatrice, page 81,
      So you were thrilled, and we picked out the mare for Harriet, and you bagsed the black, and I had the chestnut, and we all rode away one day.
    • 2007, Debra Oswald. Getting Air, page 66,
      Mum bagsed being the priestess who got to dangle Stone over the volcano by his ankles.
    • 2008, Kate Dellar-Evans, Best of Friends: The First Thirty Years of the Friendly Street Poets, page 13,
      Battered armchairs and a sofa were bagsed first; they were more comfortable than the school chairs that could get hard.
    • 2009, J. Lodge, Black Mail, page 316,
      ‘Hey, it′s my turn in the front,’ Kalista called as she realised her brother had bagsed the front seat.
    • 2016, Laurence Fearnley, The Quiet Spectacular, →ISBN, page 214:
      They used to share the water as kids, and for some reason Irene always managed to bags the first bath; Riva made do with the soapy second.
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit

InterjectionEdit

bags

  1. Used to claim something for oneself, especially in the combination 'Bags I'.
    Bags I sit in the front seat!

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

NounEdit

bags c

  1. indefinite genitive singular of bag

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

bags

  1. indefinite genitive singular of bag