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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French bailif (nominative singular bailis), itself from baillir or baillier, or from Vulgar Latin *bāiulivus (possibly as an early borrowing), from Latin baiulus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bailli m (plural baillis)

  1. (historical) a bailiff: an appointee of the king administering certain districts of northern France in the medieval period

Further readingEdit


NormanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French baillier, from Latin bāiulāre, present active infinitive of bāiulō (I carry a burden), from bāiulus (one who bears burdens, porter, carrier).

VerbEdit

bailli

  1. (France, Jersey) to give

ConjugationEdit

Alternative formsEdit
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French bailif, from Late Latin *bāiulivus (possibly as an early borrowing), from Classical Latin bāiulus (one who bears burdens, porter, carrier).

 
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NounEdit

bailli m (plural baillis)

  1. (Jersey, law) bailiff