English

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From bedgown +‎ -ed.

Adjective

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bedgowned (not comparable)

  1. Wearing a bedgown.
    • 1852 November, “The Ionian Islands and their Government”, in Fraser’s Magazine for Town and Country, volume XLVI, London: John W[illiam] Parker and Son, [], page 599:
      An anecdote is related of a member having succeeded, in Sir Thomas Maitland’s accidental absence, in having a change which he thought unimportant made upon some part of the project. Sir Thomas, on being informed of it by his ever ready secretary, returned, slippered, pantalooned, and bedgowned as he was, looked over the amendment, said a few words in condemnation or contempt of the presumption implied in it, and ordered it to be expunged from the proceedings in three most intelligible words, ‘Otez cette betise!
    • 1979, Laura London (Thomas Dale Curtis and Sharon Curtis), Moonlight Mist, Headline Eternal, published 2014, →ISBN:
      It was three-quarters of an hour later that Lynden, robed and bedgowned, padded down the hall to Lorraine’s bedroom to bid her good night.
    • 1989, Kathleen O’Connor, The Way It Happens in Novels, Available Press, Ballantine Books, →ISBN:
      Even if she accused him, no one would believe it. The bedgowned bandit—it would be a joke to the staff.