EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English biwilen, biwiȝelien (to delude, deceive), from Old English *bewīlian, *bewiġlian. Equivalent to be- +‎ wile. Doublet of beguile.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

bewile (third-person singular simple present bewiles, present participle bewiling, simple past and past participle bewiled)

  1. (transitive, rare, archaic) To delude; deceive; beguile.
    • 1865, Ballou's monthly magazine:
      He was utterly bewitched and bewiled by her beauty, and upon the following day an opportunity to prove his devotion occurred.
    • 1895, Thomas Bird Mosher, The Bibelot:
      Whomever else I might bewile, I loved him well, sorry.
    • 1995, Constance O'Banyon, La Flamme:
      To that sweet thief which sourly robs from me, which though it alter not love's sole effect, yet doth it steal sweet hours from love's delight. I may not evermore acknowledge thee, lest my bewiled guilt should do thee shame.

AnagramsEdit