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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English bordel, from Old French bordel (brothel).

NounEdit

bordel (plural bordels)

  1. (now rare) A brothel.
    • 1978, Lawrence Durrell, Livia, Faber & Faber 1992 (Avignon Quintet), p. 470:
      Appropriately enough she had given him a rendezvous (for the marriage) at the old Sphinx, opposite the Gare Montparnasse, where the respectable exterior – a family café, where families up from the country came to eat an ice and wat for their train – masked a charming bordel with a high gallery and several spotless cubicles.

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French bordel (brothel).

NounEdit

bordel m

  1. (vulgar) brothel, whorehouse
  2. (slang) fuck-up (big mistake)
  3. (vulgar) mess (disagreeable mixture or confusion of things)

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • bordel in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • bordel in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French bordel (brothel).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bɔrdɛl/, [b̥ɒˈd̥ɛlˀ]

NounEdit

bordel n (singular definite bordellet, plural indefinite bordeller)

  1. bordello, brothel, whorehouse

InflectionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French bordel, from Old French bordel, from Medieval Latin bordellum (brothel, small hut).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bordel m (plural bordels)

  1. (informal) brothel
  2. (slang) bloody mess (UK), goddamn mess (especially US)

SynonymsEdit

InterjectionEdit

bordel

  1. (vulgar, slang) bloody hell! (UK), Christ almighty!

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French bordel (brothel).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bordel m (plural bordéis)

  1. brothel

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French bordel (brothel).

NounEdit

bòrdel m (Cyrillic spelling бо̀рдел)

  1. brothel

DeclensionEdit