See also: Botter

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

bot +‎ -er

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

botter (plural botters)

  1. (Internet) One who operates a bot (automated software process).
    • 2008, New Scientist (volume 200, issues 2682-2688, page 28)
      It is estimated by industry and leading botters that only around 1 in 10 players using bots make a profit, mainly in low-stakes games.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch boter.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

botter (plural botters, diminutive bottertjie)

  1. (uncountable) butter; a soft, fatty foodstuff made from the cream of milk
  2. butter type
    Ons het 'n klomp gegeurde botters beskikbaar.
    We have a lot of flavoured butter [types]/butters available.
  3. (chemistry, dated) butter; any specific soft substance
Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

botter (present botter, present participle botterende, past participle gebotter)

  1. to butter; to spread butter

Etymology 2Edit

 
Botter (Dutch fishing vessel).

From Dutch botter.

NounEdit

botter (plural botters, diminutive bottertjie)

  1. a type of Dutch fishing vessel with a characteristic hull

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From botte (boot) +‎ -er.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bɔ.te/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

botter

  1. to kick
  2. (slang) to please, to like
    Ça te botterait d'aller au ciné?
    Would you like to go the cinema?

Usage notesEdit

In the sense please it functions syntactically like plaire, viz. it takes an indirect object and may be translated into English as like, exchanging the subject and object.

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

botte (boot) +‎ -er

VerbEdit

botter

  1. (Jersey) to boot