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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from French bourgeois (a class of citizens who were wealthier members of the Third Estate), from Anglo-Norman burgeis (town dweller), from Old French borjois, from borc (town), from Proto-Germanic *burgz (fortress), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrgʰ- (fortified elevation). The path from Proto-Germanic to Old French is unclear. Perhaps via Frankish *burg or Late Latin *burgus, or possibly both. See also the related word burgess.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈbɔːʒ.wɑː/, /ˈbʊəʒ.wɑː/
  • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /bu(ɹ)ʒ.ˈwɑː/, /ˈbu(ɹ)ʒ.wɑː/, /ˈbʊəʒ.wɑː/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

bourgeois (comparative more bourgeois, superlative most bourgeois)

  1. Of or relating to the middle class, (especially derogatory) their presumed overly conventional, conservative, and materialistic values.
    bourgeois opinion
  2. (historical) Of or relating to the bourgeoisie, the third estate of the French Ancien Regime.
  3. (Marxism) Of or relating to the capitalist class, (usually derogatory) the capitalist exploitation of the proletariat.
SynonymsEdit
  • (conventional, conservative): square
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

bourgeois (usually uncountable, plural bourgeois)

  1. (politics, collectively, usually in the plural) The middle class.
  2. (rare) An individual member of the middle class.
  3. (usually derogatory) A person of any class with bourgeois (i.e., overly conventional and materialistic) values and attitudes.
  4. (historical) An individual member of the bourgeoisie, the third estate of the French Ancien Regime.
  5. (Marxism) A capitalist, (usually derogatory) an exploiter of the proletariat.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

bourgeois (third-person singular simple present bourgeoises, present participle bourgeoising, simple past and past participle bourgeoised)

  1. (transitive) To make bourgeois.

Further readingEdit

  • "bourgeois" in Raymond Williams, Keywords (revised), 1983, Fontana Press, page 45.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English burjois, from French Bourgois, probably from Bourges (the French city) + -ois (forming adjectives) but possibly from bourgeois above or from Jean de Bouregois who worked as a printer in Rouen c. 1500.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bourgeois (uncountable)

  1. (printing, dated) A size of type between brevier and long primer, standardized as 9-point.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French bourgeois.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bourgeois m (plural bourgeois, diminutive bourgeoistje n)

  1. bourgeois

Related termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French borgeis (town dweller), from borc (fortified place, town), from Proto-Germanic *burgz (fortress), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrgʰ- (fortified elevation). The path from Proto-Germanic to Old French is unclear. Perhaps via Frankish *burg or Late Latin *burgus, or possibly both, and probably through the Late Latin intermediate burgensis. Compare Italian borghese, Portuguese burguês, Spanish burgués.

Synchronically analysable as bourg +‎ -ois.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

bourgeois (feminine singular bourgeoise, masculine plural bourgeois, feminine plural bourgeoises)

  1. bourgeois

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

bourgeois m (plural bourgeois, feminine bourgeoise)

  1. member of the middle class
  2. bourgeois

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French, itself from a Germanic origin.

AdjectiveEdit

bourgeois (comparative bourgeoiser, superlative am bourgeoisesten)

  1. bourgeois

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit