EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English bolken, bulken, alteration of earlier balken, from Old English bealcan (to belch; utter). Comare Dutch bulken (to roar). More at bolk.

VerbEdit

bowk (third-person singular simple present bowks, present participle bowking or bowkin, simple past and past participle bowked)

  1. (Geordie) To belch, to burp.
    • 1966, William Mayne, Earthfasts, Peter Smith (1989), →ISBN, page 37:
      "That made me bowk," he said; and he bowked again. He took another swig with caution, and gave the bottle to David, and they swigged at it in turn.
    • 1997, Brian P. Martin, Tales of the Old Countrywomen, David & Charles (1997), →ISBN, page 143:
      If this man did not feed the mill carefully and regularly it bowked with "indigestion" and this slowed everything up.
    • 2008, Sid Waddell, Taak of the Toon: How to Speak Geordie, HarperCollins (2008), →ISBN, page 92:
      He claimed that meat or cheese made you 'bowk' (belch) and get stomach cramps — the last thing you need 'yakking' (using a pick) coal for eight tough hours in a two-foot 'cavil' (job area).
  2. (Britain) To vomit.
    • 2004, Chris Donald, Rude Kids: The Unfeasible Story of Viz, HarperCollins (2004), →ISBN, page 275:
      At that point another of my guests, a highly respected Newcastle art gallery owner by the name of Rashida, bowked up all over the floor behind me.
    • 2009, Blythe Gifford, In the Master's Bed, Harlequin (2009), →ISBN, page 64:
      'Take yourself to bed then. And don't whine to me tomorrow about how you bowked your guts out all night.'
    • 2010, Mike Harper, Little Mickey H: A Norbury Lad, AuthorHouse (2010), →ISBN, page 107:
      Firstly, aged perhaps five or six after polishing off a banana and a slice of bread and butter in the back room at tea time, taking my plate out to the kitchen, I managed to make it only as far as the spin dryer in the hall before bowking richly over the lino.
    • 2011, Erica Bell, The Voyage of the Shuckenoor, Interactive Publications (2011), →ISBN, unnumbered page:
      Misima bowked beside him, bent over double. They made twin streams of yellow bile in the heather.

ReferencesEdit

  • The New Geordie Dictionary, Frank Graham, 1987, →ISBN
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [1]
  • Todd's Geordie Words and Phrases, George Todd, Newcastle, 1977[2]
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, →ISBN

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Scots bolk (to belch). Cognate with Geordie bowk and General Scots boak (but does not have quite the same meaning).

NounEdit

bowk (uncountable)

  1. (South Scots) vomit; sick

VerbEdit

bowk (third-person singular present bowks, present participle bowkin, past bowkt, past participle bowkt)

  1. (South Scots) to vomit; to throw up.