See also: buffò

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian buffo.

NounEdit

buffo (plural buffos)

  1. (music) A comic singer, particularly in comic opera
    • 2007, January 27, “Vivien Schweitzer”, in Young Lovers, a Vespa and a Frolic by Rossini[1]:
      Signor Bruschino was updated from a generic buffo character to an oily, scholarly-looking, suit-clad neurotic, excellently acted and sung by Marco Nistico.

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbuf.fo/
  • Rhymes: -uffo
  • Hyphenation: bùf‧fo

Etymology 1Edit

Compare Old French bouffer, originally "to puff up;" both are from Medieval Latin buffa, itself echoic of puffing out cheeks.[1]

AdjectiveEdit

buffo (feminine singular buffa, masculine plural buffi, feminine plural buffe)

  1. funny, comical, amusing
  2. strange, odd, goofy
  3. whimsical
  4. playful
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Onomatopoeic.

NounEdit

buffo m (plural buffi)

  1. gust (of wind)
    Synonyms: folata, soffio
  2. puff (of smoke)
    Synonym: sbuffo
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Alteration of puf, from French pouf (debt), used in locutions such as faire pouf and à pouf.

NounEdit

buffo m (plural buffi)

  1. (Rome, chiefly in the plural) debt
    Synonym: debito

Etymology 4Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

buffo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of buffare

ReferencesEdit

  • buffo1 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana
  • buffo2 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana
  • buffo3 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana
  1. ^ Pianigiani, Ottorino (1907) , “buffo”, in Vocabolario etimologico della lingua italiana (in Italian), Rome: Albrighi & Segati