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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

onomatopoeic

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bʌz/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: buzz
  • Rhymes: -ʌz

NounEdit

buzz (countable and uncountable, plural buzzes)

Examples
(file)
  1. A continuous, humming noise, as of bees; a confused murmur, as of general conversation in low tones.
  2. A whisper.
  3. The audible friction of voice consonants.
  4. (informal) A rush or feeling of energy or excitement; a feeling of slight intoxication.
    Still feeling the buzz from the coffee, he pushed through the last of the homework.
  5. (informal) A telephone call or e-mail.
  6. (informal, preceded by the) Major topic of conversation; widespread rumor; information spread behind the scenes.
    • 2006 Sept. 6, Daren Fonda, "Ford Motor's New Chief: "I Think It's a Tough Situation"," Time:
      In Detroit, the buzz is that he's too nice a guy, unwilling to impose draconian job cuts at the risk of angering the UAW.
    • 2011 Allen Gregory, "Pilot" (season 1, episode 1):
      Allen Gregory DeLongpre: Who's he?
      Patrick: He's only the most popular kid in school.
      Allen Gregory: Ah, the two heavyweights finally meet. Sure you're tired of all the buzz. Allen Gregory DeLongpre.
      Joel Zadak: Joel...Zadak!

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

buzz (third-person singular simple present buzzes, present participle buzzing, simple past and past participle buzzed)

  1. (intransitive) To make a low, continuous, humming or sibilant sound, like that made by bees with their wings.
    • Longfellow
      Like a wasp it buzzed, and stung him.
    • 1922, D. H. Lawrence, Fantasia of the Unconscious, ch. 2:
      So that now the universe has escaped from the pin which was pushed through it, like an impaled fly vainly buzzing, [] we can hope also to escape.
    1. (by extension) To utter a murmuring sound; to speak with a low, humming voice.
      • Shakespeare
        However these disturbers of our peace / Buzz in the people's ears.
    2. (chiefly of an insect) To fly while making such a sound.
      • 1897, Bram Stoker, Dracula, ch. 20:
        The flies, lethargic with the autumn, were beginning to buzz into the room.
  2. (colloquial) To show a high level of activity and haste (alluding to the common simile "busy as a bee"). Often in the colloquial imperative "Buzz off!"
  3. (transitive) To whisper; to communicate, as tales, in an undertone; to spread, as a report, by whispers or secretly.
    • Shakespeare
      I will buzz abroad such prophecies / That Edward shall be fearful of his life.
  4. (transitive) To talk to incessantly or confidentially in a low humming voice.
  5. (aviation) To fly at high speed and at a very low altitude over a specified area, as to make a surprise pass.
    • 2013, The Economist, Stopping asteroid strikes: Defenders of the Earth
      [] an asteroid a mere 15-20 metres across exploded with the force of a medium-sized atom bomb over Chelyabinsk, in Russia, and another, much larger one buzzed Earth a few hours later.
  6. (transitive) To cut the hair in a close-cropped military style, or buzzcut.
    • 2012, Ellen Hartman, Out of Bounds (page 130)
      Deacon said, “You used to beg me to let you buzz your hair when you were little.” “And then I grew up and realized how awful you looked when you buzzed yours.”
  7. (archaic, transitive) To drink to the bottom.
    • 1849, The New Monthly Magazine and Universal Register
      He buzzed the bottle with such a hearty good will as settled the fate of another, which Soapey rang for as a matter of course. There was but the rejected one, which however Spigot put into a different decanter and brought in []
  8. (transitive) To communicate with (a person) by means of a buzzer.
    • 2012, Steven Joseph Sinopoli, The Seventh House (page 66)
      Then one day my secretary buzzed me and said Frank Sinatra was on the phone. When I picked up the phone it was the Chief who played dumb and would not admit that he said he was Frank Sinatra.

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

English.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

buzz m (uncountable)

  1. buzz (excitement)