camaraderie

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French camaraderie, from Spanish camarada, from cámara (bedroom), from Latin camera (a chamber); see chamber. Literally “one with whom one shares one’s bedroom”. Recent American pronunciations such as /ˌkɑməˈɹɑdəɹi/ and /ˌkɑmˈɹɑdəɹi/ are influenced by the cognate comrade.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

camaraderie (countable and uncountable, plural camaraderies)

  1. Close friendship in a group of friends or teammates.
    • 2016 February 8, Marwan Bishara, “Why Obama fails the leadership test in the Middle East”, in Al Jazeera English[1]:
      And regardless of their differences, they always act with such camaraderie and complicity among themselves.
  2. A spirit of familiarity and closeness
    • 1838, Caulincourt, Napoleon and his Times, Volume 1, page 175:
      There was not one of Napoleon's intimate friends, however high in rank, who would have ventured to indulge in the sort of camaraderie which was kept up between the Emperor and his old moustaches.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From camarade (from Spanish camarada (roommate), from cámara (bedroom), from Latin camera (room), from Ancient Greek καμάρα (kamára, vaulted chamber)) +‎ -erie.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

camaraderie f (plural camaraderies)

  1. camaraderie

Further readingEdit