See also: caméo

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian cammeo, from Medieval Latin camaeus, of unknown origin. The movie sense is short for “cameo role” referring to a famous person who was playing no character, but him or herself. Like a cameo brooch — a low-relief carving of a person’s head or bust — the actor or celebrity is instantly recognizable. More recently, it has come to refer to any short appearances, whether as a character or as oneself.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cameo (plural cameos or cameoes)

  1. A piece of jewelry, etc., carved in relief.
  2. A single very brief appearance, especially by a prominent celebrity in a movie or song.
    Famous comic book writer Stan Lee had a cameo in the Spider-Man movie. He was on screen for perhaps ten seconds, but aficionados distinctly remember him.
    • 1922, Michael Arlen, “Ep./4/2”, in “Piracy”: A Romantic Chronicle of These Days:
      As they turned into Hertford Street they startled a robin from the poet's head on a barren fountain, and he fled away with a cameo note.
    • 2020 September 5, Phil McNulty, “Iceland 0-1 England”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      Southgate will have been delighted to give Foden the first of many England caps while Greenwood will also have enjoyed his taste of international action during his cameo after coming on as a substitute for Kane.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

cameo (third-person singular simple present cameos, present participle cameoing, simple past and past participle cameoed)

  1. To appear in a cameo role.

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English cameo, from Italian cammeo.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cameo m (plural camei)

  1. cameo (short appearance)

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English cameo.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kaˈmeo/, [kaˈme.o]

NounEdit

cameo m (plural cameos)

  1. cameo (short appearance)