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See also: ĉamo

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From camouflage, by shortening

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

camo (countable and uncountable, plural camos)

  1. (textiles) A pattern on clothing consisting of irregularly shaped patches that are either greenish/brownish, brownish/whitish, or bluish/whitish, as used by ground combat forces.
  2. Clothes made from camouflage fabric, for concealment in combat or hunting.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

camo (third-person singular simple present camos, present participle camoing, simple past and past participle camoed)

  1. (informal) To camouflage.
  2. (informal) To put on camouflage clothing.

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cāmus, from Doric Ancient Greek κᾱμός (kāmós) (Attic κημός (kēmós)).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈka.mo/, [ˈkäːmo̞]
  • Rhymes: -amo
  • Stress: càmo
  • Hyphenation: ca‧mo

NounEdit

camo m (plural cami) (obsolete)

  1. muzzle
  2. (figuratively) (moral) restraint
    • 1321, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Purgatorio [The Divine Comedy: Purgatory] (paperback, in Italian), Bompiani, published 2001, Canto XIV, lines 142–144, page 215:
      Già era l'aura d'ogne parte queta; ¶ ed el mi disse: «Quel fu 'l duro camo ¶ che dovria l'uom tener dentro a sua meta. [] »
      Already on all sides the air was quiet; ¶ and said he to me: "That was the hard curb ¶ that ought to hold a man within his bounds."

LatinEdit