Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unknown. Perhaps borrowed from Old Northern French choper (to cut off), from colp (strike, hit).[1]

Cognate with Middle Low German kappen (to cut; clip; chop off), Middle English chappen, choppen (to chop), Alemannic German kchapfen (to chop into small pieces). Compare also Dutch kippen, English chip and chap.

VerbEdit

cappen

  1. to chop, to cleave

InflectionEdit

Weak
Infinitive cappen
3rd sg. past
3rd pl. past
Past participle
Infinitive cappen
In genitive cappens
In dative cappene
Indicative Present Past
1st singular cappe
2nd singular caps, cappes
3rd singular capt, cappet
1st plural cappen
2nd plural capt, cappet
3rd plural cappen
Subjunctive Present Past
1st singular cappe
2nd singular caps, cappes
3rd singular cappe
1st plural cappen
2nd plural capt, cappet
3rd plural cappen
Imperative Present
Singular cap, cappe
Plural capt, cappet
Present Past
Participle cappende

DescendantsEdit

  • Dutch: kappen
  • Limburgish: kappe

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2022), “chop”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From cappe +‎ -en (plural suffix).

NounEdit

cappen

  1. plural of cappe

Etymology 2Edit

From cappe +‎ -en (infinitival suffix).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

cappen

  1. To put a cap or hat on; to wear headgear.
ConjugationEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit