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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English carken, also charken (to be anxious, worry; to load (sth.); to bear (crops)), from Anglo-Norman charger, also chargere, chargier, chargir; charcher, charchier; carger, cargier, cargir; carker, carkere; karker; jarger (“to load; to burden; to harass, worry; to calculate, estimate (quantities); to charge, call to account; to charge, command; to instruct; to entrust, to allege, plead; to attach importance to”).[1] Compare Old French chargier (to load).[2]

VerbEdit

cark (third-person singular simple present carks, present participle carking, simple past and past participle carked)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To be filled with worry, solicitude, or troubles.
  2. (obsolete, transitive, intransitive) To bring worry, vexation, or anxiety.
    • 1831, Adam Clarke, Commentary on the Bible, Comment on 2 Timothy 2: 22:
      Carnal pleasures are the sins of youth: ambition and the love of power, the sins of middle age: covetousness and carking cares, the crimes of old age.
    • 1902, William James, The Varieties of Religious Experience, Lecture 3:
      [W]e shall see how in morbid melancholy this sense of the unreality of things may become a carking pain, and even lead to suicide.
    • 1913, Mrs. [Marie] Belloc Lowndes, chapter I, in The Lodger, London: Methuen, OCLC 7780546; republished in Novels of Mystery: The Lodger; The Story of Ivy; What Really Happened, New York, N.Y.: Longmans, Green and Co., 55 Fifth Avenue, [1933], OCLC 2666860, page 0056:
      Thanks to that penny he had just spent so recklessly [on a newspaper] he would pass a happy hour, taken, for once, out of his anxious, despondent, miserable self. It irritated him shrewdly to know that these moments of respite from carking care would not be shared with his poor wife, with careworn, troubled Ellen.
  3. (intransitive) To labor anxiously.

NounEdit

cark (plural carks)

  1. (obsolete) A noxious or corroding worry.
    • Spenser
      His heavy head, devoid of careful cark.
    • Motherwell
      Fling cark and care aside.
    • R. D. Blackmore
      Freedom from the cares of money and the cark of fashion.
  2. (obsolete) The state of being filled with worry.

Etymology 2Edit

From caulk.

VerbEdit

cark (third-person singular simple present carks, present participle carking, simple past and past participle carked)

  1. Eye dialect spelling of caulk.

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

cark

  1. See cark it.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cark (plural carks)

  1. (archaic) Worry, anxiety.

VerbEdit

cark (third-person singular present carks, present participle carkin, past carkt, past participle carkt)

  1. (archaic) To worry or be anxious.