carpe diem

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Latin carpe diem (seize the day).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌkɑː.peɪ ˈdiː.əm/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˌkɑɹ.peɪ ˈdi.əm/

ProverbEdit

carpe diem

  1. Seize the day, make the most of today, enjoy the present.
    • 1905, G. K. Chesterton, Heretics[1], New York: John Lane, OL 24174141M:
      It is the carpe diem religion; but the carpe diem religion is not the religion of happy people, but of very unhappy people.
    • 2007 July 30, Lee Harris, “Can Carpe Diem Societies Survive?”, in The Suicide of Reason: Radical Islam's Threat to the West, New York: Basic Books, ISBN 9780465002030, LCCN 2007007954, OL 9697473M, page 241:
      Indeed, in an extreme carpe diem society, children are raised without being given any sense that they have a transgenerational duty to the as yet unborn— the duty to leave them a better world.
    • 2011 January 29, “Rollercoaster: The Musical!”, Phineas and Ferb season 2 episode 38, “Carpe Diem” (song):
      Just grab those opportunities when you see 'em / Cause every day's a brand new day, you gotta carpe diem

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Horace, Odes I.xi.8: Carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero, meaning “seize the day while trusting little on what tomorrow might bring”.

PronunciationEdit

PhraseEdit

carpe diem

  1. carpe diem, seize the day

PortugueseEdit

ProverbEdit

carpe diem

  1. seize the day (enjoy the present)
Last modified on 30 March 2014, at 20:32