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See also: Castor

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French castor (beaver), from Latin castor (beaver).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

castor (plural castors)

  1. A pivoting roller attached to the bottom of furniture to allow it to be moved.
  2. A hat made from the fur of the beaver.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      I have always been known for the jaunty manner in which I wear my castor.
  3. A caster; a container with perforated cap for sprinkling (e.g. pepper-castor).
  4. A heavy quality of broadcloth for overcoats.
  5. castoreum
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Named from Greek mythology; see Castor and Pollux. The name pollux was given to another mineral with which it was always found.

NounEdit

castor (uncountable)

  1. (mineralogy) A variety of petalite found in Elba.
SynonymsEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for castor in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

NounEdit

castor m (plural castores)

  1. beaver

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin castor.

NounEdit

castor m (plural castors)

  1. beaver

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

 
castor

EtymologyEdit

From Latin castor (beaver).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

castor m (plural castors)

  1. beaver (aquatic mammal)

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin castor (beaver).

NounEdit

castor m (plural castores)

  1. beaver

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek κάστωρ (kástōr), from Doric Greek κάστον (káston, wood). See also Sanskrit कस्तूरी (kastūrī, musk)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

castor m (genitive castoris); third declension

  1. beaver

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative castor castorēs
genitive castoris castorum
dative castorī castoribus
accusative castorem castorēs
ablative castore castoribus
vocative castor castorēs

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • castor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • castor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “castor”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • castor” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • castor in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • castor in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French castor, from Latin castor (beaver).

NounEdit

castor m (plural castors)

  1. (Jersey) beaver

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin castor (beaver).

NounEdit

castor m (plural castores)

  1. beaver

RomanianEdit

 
Castori

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French castor and its source, Latin castor, from Ancient Greek κάστωρ (kástōr).

NounEdit

castor m (plural castori)

  1. beaver

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin castor (beaver).

NounEdit

castor m (plural castores)

  1. beaver