See also: Castro, castró, and castrò

Catalan

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Verb

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castro

  1. first-person singular present indicative of castrar

Galician

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Castro de Viladonga, aerial view
 
Castro de Baroña

Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Old Galician-Portuguese castro, from Latin castrum. Cognate with Portuguese castro, Spanish castro. See also alcázar, borrowed from Spanish, which entered through Arabic.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈkastɾo/ [ˈkɑs̺.t̪ɾʊ]
  • Rhymes: -astɾo
  • Hyphenation: cas‧tro

Noun

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castro m (plural castros)

  1. a local fortified Iron Age village, of which some 3,000 are known in Galicia
  2. (by extension) any fortified archaeological site

Derived terms

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See also

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References

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  • Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja, Ana Isabel Boullón Agrelo (20062022) “castro”, in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • Xavier Varela Barreiro, Xavier Gómez Guinovart (20062018) “castro”, in Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • castro” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • castro” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • castro” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Italian

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Verb

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castro

  1. first-person singular present indicative of castrare

Anagrams

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Latin

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Etymology

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From Proto-Italic *kastrāō, denominative in perhaps from a lost instrumental noun, Proto-Italic *kastrom (knife), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱos-tróm (cutting tool, knife), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱes- (to cut up, to slaughter); compare Sanskrit शस्त्र (śastra, sword, dagger).[1] See also castrum, careō.

Pronunciation

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Verb

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castrō (present infinitive castrāre, perfect active castrāvī, supine castrātum); first conjugation

  1. to prune
  2. to amputate
  3. to punish
  4. to purge
  5. to castrate or spay
    • Late 8th century, unknown author, Lex Frisionum:
      Qui fanum effregerit, et ibi aliquid de sacris tulerit, ducitur ad mare et in sabulo quod accessus maris operire solet, finduntur aures eius et castratur, et immolatur diis quorum templa violavit.
      The person who breaks into a temple and takes away some of its holy contents shall be taken to the sea, to that part of the sand that is covered during flood, where his ears shall be torn and he shall be castrated and be sacrificed to the gods whose temple he violated.
  6. to dock (a tail)

Conjugation

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   Conjugation of castrō (first conjugation)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present castrō castrās castrat castrāmus castrātis castrant
imperfect castrābam castrābās castrābat castrābāmus castrābātis castrābant
future castrābō castrābis castrābit castrābimus castrābitis castrābunt
perfect castrāvī castrāvistī castrāvit castrāvimus castrāvistis castrāvērunt,
castrāvēre
pluperfect castrāveram castrāverās castrāverat castrāverāmus castrāverātis castrāverant
future perfect castrāverō castrāveris castrāverit castrāverimus castrāveritis castrāverint
passive present castror castrāris,
castrāre
castrātur castrāmur castrāminī castrantur
imperfect castrābar castrābāris,
castrābāre
castrābātur castrābāmur castrābāminī castrābantur
future castrābor castrāberis,
castrābere
castrābitur castrābimur castrābiminī castrābuntur
perfect castrātus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect castrātus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect castrātus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present castrem castrēs castret castrēmus castrētis castrent
imperfect castrārem castrārēs castrāret castrārēmus castrārētis castrārent
perfect castrāverim castrāverīs castrāverit castrāverīmus castrāverītis castrāverint
pluperfect castrāvissem castrāvissēs castrāvisset castrāvissēmus castrāvissētis castrāvissent
passive present castrer castrēris,
castrēre
castrētur castrēmur castrēminī castrentur
imperfect castrārer castrārēris,
castrārēre
castrārētur castrārēmur castrārēminī castrārentur
perfect castrātus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect castrātus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present castrā castrāte
future castrātō castrātō castrātōte castrantō
passive present castrāre castrāminī
future castrātor castrātor castrantor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives castrāre castrāvisse castrātūrum esse castrārī castrātum esse castrātum īrī
participles castrāns castrātūrus castrātus castrandus
verbal nouns gerund supine
genitive dative accusative ablative accusative ablative
castrandī castrandō castrandum castrandō castrātum castrātū

Derived terms

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Descendants

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Many reflexes show rhotic metathesis and/or crossing with crista.

References

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  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) “castrō”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 97

Further reading

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  • castro”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • castro”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • castro in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • castro in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.

Portuguese

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Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt
 
castro

Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Old Galician-Portuguese castro, from Latin castrum, from Proto-Indo-European *kes- (to cut, cut off, separate). Cognate with Galician and Spanish castro. Doublet of alcácer, via Arabic.

Alternative forms

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Noun

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castro m (plural castros)

  1. fort (of Roman or prehistoric origin)
  2. a fortified pre-Roman Iron Age village frequently found in the northwestern regions of the Iberian Peninsula
Derived terms
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See also
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Etymology 2

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

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castro

  1. first-person singular present indicative of castrar

Spanish

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈkastɾo/ [ˈkas.t̪ɾo]
  • Rhymes: -astɾo
  • Syllabification: cas‧tro

Etymology 1

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Borrowed from Latin castrum. Also survives natively in several Spanish toponyms. Doublet of alcázar, which came through Arabic.

Noun

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castro m (plural castros)

  1. fort, fortified settlement
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Etymology 2

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

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castro

  1. first-person singular present indicative of castrar

Further reading

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