EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin causalis, from Latin causa (cause); see cause.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɔːz.əl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔːzəl

AdjectiveEdit

causal (comparative more causal, superlative most causal)

  1. of, relating to, or being a cause of something; causing
    There is no causal relationship between eating carrots and seeing in the dark.
    • 2021 February 24, Greg Morse, “Great Heck: a tragic chain of events”, in RAIL, number 925, page 44:
      Time changes attitudes, and while Hart's actions in driving when not fit to do so were certainly in the causal chain of the Great Heck accident, how many other drivers were out there driving when too fatigued to do so?

Usage notesEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

causal (plural causals)

  1. (grammar) a word (such as because) that expresses a reason or a cause

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin causālis, from Latin causa.

AdjectiveEdit

causal (masculine and feminine plural causals)

  1. causal

Related termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin causālis, from Latin causa.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

causal (feminine causale, masculine plural causaux, feminine plural causales)

  1. causal

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin causālis, from Latin causa.

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: cau‧sal
  • Rhymes: -al, -aw

AdjectiveEdit

causal m or f (plural causais, comparable)

  1. causal (of, relating to or being a cause of something)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin causālis, from Latin causa.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

causal (plural causales)

  1. causal

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit