caution

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Recorded since 1297 as Middle English caucioun (bail, guarantee, pledge), from Old French caution (security, surety), itself from Latin cautiō, from cautus, past participle of caveō, cavēre (be on one's guard).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

caution (countable and uncountable, plural cautions)

  1. Prudence when faced with, or when expecting to face, danger; care taken in order to avoid risk or harm.
    take caution
    have caution
    exercise great caution
    utmost caution is required when travelling in this dangerous neighbourhood
    act with caution
  2. A careful attention to the probable effects of an act, in order that failure or harm may be avoided.
    The guideline expressed caution against excessive radiographic imaging.
  3. Security; guaranty; bail.
  4. (dated) One who draws attention or causes astonishment by their behaviour.
    Oh, that boy, he's a caution! He does make me laugh.
  5. (law) A formal warning given as an alternative to prosecution in minor cases.
  6. (soccer) A yellow card.

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TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

caution (third-person singular simple present cautions, present participle cautioning, simple past and past participle cautioned)

  1. (transitive) To warn; to alert, advise that caution is warranted.
  2. (soccer) To give a yellow card

TranslationsEdit

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French caution, borrowed from Latin cautiō, cautiōnem, from cautus, past participle of caveō, cavēre (be on one's guard).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

caution f (plural cautions)

  1. caution, guaranty, bail
  2. deposit
  3. security deposit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French caution, borrowed from Latin cautiō, cautiōnem.

NounEdit

caution f (plural cautions)

  1. (Jersey) deposit
  2. (Jersey, law) bail