English

edit

Alternative forms

edit

Pronunciation

edit
  • IPA(key): /ˈsɛləbət/
  • Audio (US):(file)

Etymology 1

edit

Probably from the noun (“celibacy”) or from celibacy on the model of privacy/private, etc.[1] Alternatively, from Latin caelebs (unmarried) +‎ -ate.[2]

Adjective

edit

celibate (not comparable)

  1. (chiefly religious) Not married. [from 1827]
  2. (by extension) Abstaining from sexual relations and pleasures.
    Members of religious communities sometimes take vows to remain celibate.
Synonyms
edit
Hyponyms
edit
Derived terms
edit
edit
Translations
edit

Noun

edit

celibate (uncountable)

  1. One who is not married, especially one who has taken a religious vow not to get married, usually because of being a member of a religious community. [from 1869]
    • 1893, Matilda Joslyn Gage, Woman, Church and State: A Historical Account of the Status of Woman Through the Christian Ages: with Reminiscences of the Matriarchate:
      Even during the ages that priestly marriage was permitted, celibates obtained a higher reputation for sanctity and virtue than married priests, who infinitely more than celibates were believed subject to infestation by demons.
Synonyms
edit
Translations
edit
See also
edit

Verb

edit

celibate (third-person singular simple present celibates, present participle celibating, simple past and past participle celibated)

  1. (rare, intransitive) To practice celibacy.
    • 1941, Michigan Raw Review, page 34:
      However, be that as it may, Stason celebrated with the boys while Hessel celibated alone.
    • 1973, Stevens Indicator - Volumes 90-91, page 55:
      These kids were winding up 45 years and 4 days of celebrating. Me? I'm winding up seven years of celibating looking for a patient virgin.
    • 1983, Jerry Bamman, Ecco!, page 1-36:
      RICHARD: The Franciscans have turned me down, Angelina. They have asked me to travel another road to sainthood. TOM: Richard is done with celibating!
    • 2010, Joan Smith, Aurora:
      But if she must break off her celibating, it's a shame and a pity she had to choose him to do it with.
    • 2012, Ted Huntington, Big Science Secrets, Lies, and Mistakes, page 129:
      But also with labels like “whore” and “slut”, as a male, it's annoying, because, women don't need to be chastised and made colder in this ice age we live in— they need to be warmed up, turned on, complimented, celebrated (not celibated), encouraged to enjoy their bodies, and pursue pleasure soberly and intelligently.

Etymology 2

edit

From French célibat (celibacy), from Latin caelibātus (celibacy), from caelebs (unmarried);[3] compare German Zölibat (celibacy).

Noun

edit

celibate (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) A celibate state; celibacy. [from 1614]
    • 1678, Jeremy Taylor, “The History of the Life and Death of the Holy Jesus: []. The Third Part.”, in Antiquitates Christianæ: Or, the History of the Life and Death of the Holy Jesus: [], London: [] E. Flesher, and R. Norton, for R[ichard] Royston, [], →OCLC, section XIV (Of the Third Year of the Preaching of Jesus), page 327:
      He [] preferreth holy Cœlibate before the eſtate of Marriage, []
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, chapter II, in Watt, 1st American edition, New York, N.Y.: Grove Press, published 1959, →OCLC, page 139:
      And Mrs Gorman had had several admirers, both before and after Mr Gorman, and even during Mr Gorman, and Watt at least two well defined romances, in the course of his celibate.
Translations
edit

References

edit
  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2024) “celibate (adj.)”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  2. ^ celibate, adj. and n.2”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, launched 2000.
  3. ^ celibate, n.1”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, launched 2000.

Anagrams

edit