cessation

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French cessation, itself a borrowing from Latin cessātiō.

PronunciationEdit

  • (US) IPA(key): /sɛˈseɪʃən/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

NounEdit

cessation (countable and uncountable, plural cessations)

  1. (formal) A ceasing or discontinuance, for example of an action, whether temporary or final.
    • 1856, John Lothrop Motley, The Rise of the Dutch Republic. A History. [], volume (please specify |volume=I to III), New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, [], OCLC 1138660207:
      it might be advisable to permit the temporary cessation of the papal inquisition
    • 1630, John Hayward, The Life and Raigne of King Edward VI
      The day [] was [] yearly observ'd for a festival Day by cessation from Labour.

SynonymsEdit

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin cessātiō. Morphologically, from cesser +‎ -ation.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cessation f (plural cessations)

  1. cessation

Further readingEdit