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See also: Champagne

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

 
A glass of champagne

Borrowed from French champagne (sparkling wine from the Champagne region), from Champagne (region and former province of France), from Late Latin campānia (in full Campānia Rēmēnsis), from campāneus (of or pertaining to the fields), from Latin campus (level ground; field, plain), from Proto-Indo-European *kh₂emp- (to bend, curve). The English word is a doublet of campagna (flat stretch of countryside) and campaign.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

champagne (countable and uncountable, plural champagnes)

  1. (countable, uncountable) A sparkling white wine made from a blend of grapes, especially Chardonnay and pinot, produced in Champagne, France, by the méthode champenoise.
    • 1809 April, “Art. 37. Military Promotions; or the Duke and His Dulcinea. A Satirical Poem. 4to. 2s. 6d. Richardson. [book review]”, in The Monthly Review; or, Literary Journal, Enlarged, volume LVIII, London: Sold by T[homas] Becket, [], OCLC 901376714, page 439:
      We suppose that this author has done his best to be satirical; and he may have thought that his subject would have inspired him with all that was smart and piquant: but the plain truth is that the promised champagne turns out to be vapid small beer.
    • 1822, [Walter Scott], chapter VIII, in Peveril of the Peak. [...] In Four Volumes, volume IV, Edinburgh: Printed for Archibald Constable and Co.; London: Hurst, Robinson, and Co., OCLC 2392685, page 197:
      "[…] That stuff on the table may be a vehicle for filberts and walnuts, but not for such communications as yours. —Bring me champaigne," he said to the attendant who answered on his summons. The domestic returned, and brought a flask of champaigne, with two large silver cups.
    • 1827, Francis Herbert [pseudonym; William Cullen Bryant, Robert Charles Sands, and Gulian Crommelin Verplanck], “The Legend of the Devil’s Pulpit”, in The Talisman for MDCCCXXVIII, New York, N.Y.: Elam Bliss, [], OCLC 81472362, page 284:
      [T]he women will wear cashmeres, and then men will drink champagne.
    • 1867, Robert Tomes, chapter XV, in The Champagne Country, New York, N.Y.: Published by [Melancthon M.] Hurd and [Henry Oscar] Houghton, [], OCLC 23788854, page 173:
      Champagne wine, with its amber hue, it éclat, its sparkle, and its perfume, arouses the senses and produces a cheerfulness which flashes through the company like a spark of electricity. At the magic word, Champagne! the guests, dull and torpid with good feeding, awake at once.
    • 1875 January 8, “Sparkling Hock”, in The Pall Mall Budget: [], volume XIII, London: [s.n.] [], OCLC 811464416, page 14, column 2:
      The principal difference between champagnes and sparkling hocks designed for the English market consists in the former being made almost exclusively from red grapes, pressed immediately they are gathered, and not allowed to ferment in their skins, while the latter are made from white grapes alone. The finest champagnes come from the pineau noir, or black Burgundy grape, while the best sparkling hocks are made from the Riesling, []
    • 1988 May 20, Daniel Santow, “Restaurant tours: You loved the movie, now eat the dinner”, in Chicago Reader[1], archived from the original on 15 July 2018:
      Served throughout the meal are sherries, red wines, champagnes, and brandies.
    • 2017, Peter Liem; Kate Leahy, “The Primacy of Place”, in Champagne: The Essential Guide to the Wines, Producers, and Terroirs of the Iconic Region, Calif.; N.Y.: Ten Speed Press, →ISBN, part 1 (Understanding Champagne), page 11:
      As with a solo cello, a single-vineyard champagne highlights the virtuosity of the performer (whether it's the producer or the site). A vintage champagne demonstrates the singular personality of the year, while a great blended champagne such as Krug's Grand Cuvée expresses a multifaceted, encompassing experience akin to the London Symphony Orchestra playing [Pyotr Ilyich] Tchaikovsky's Symphony no. 6, leveraging its components to create something larger than each of them represents individually.
  2. (countable, uncountable, informal) Any sparkling wine made by the méthode champenoise.
    • 1830, “Champagne”, in Francis Lieber and E. Wigglesworth, editors, Encyclopædia Americana. [], volume III, Philadelphia, Pa.: [Edward Lawrence] Carey & [Abraham] Lea [...], OCLC 16287802, page 58, column 1:
      Of the Reims mountain wines, those of Verzi, Verzenay, Mailli, Bouzy, and St. Basle, are most esteemed; but the Clos St. Thierry furnishes perhaps the finest red Champagne. The name Jolly champagne, under which, at present, a large quantity of the best champagne is sold in the U[nited] States, does not originate from a place in Champagne, but from an owner of extensive vineyards in that province, who exports much champagne to the U. States.
    • 1915 May, “Great Western Champagne [advertisement]”, in Frank Crowninshield, editor, Vanity Fair, volume 4, number 3, New York, N.Y.: Vanity Fair Publishing Company, OCLC 423870134, page 96:
      Great Western Champagne [] Produced by the old French slow method of fermentation in the bottle taking from six to seven years of time. Great Western is the Only American Champagne ever awarded a Gold Medal at Foreign Expositions. [] Oldest and largest producers of Champagne in America.
  3. (countable, uncountable, informal) Any sparkling white wine.
  4. (countable) A glass of champagne.
    • 2017 April 11, Paul Ewart, quoting Christa Billich, “Fifteen Years on, what Long-term Botox Use Looks Like”, in News.com.au[2], archived from the original on 29 December 2017:
      "I'm not scared of needles, but I certainly don’t like them," she says. "I had a champagne en route to the clinic – maybe two – which I'd probably not recommended, but whatever works, right? []"
  5. (countable) A very pale brownish-gold colour, similar to that of champagne.
    champagne colour:  
    • 1915 February, “Franklin Simon & Co. [advertisement]”, in Frank Crowninshield, editor, Vanity Fair, volume 3, number 6, New York, N.Y.: Vanity Fair Publishing Company, OCLC 423870134, page 3:
      Suede Leather Hat, in gray, champagne, rose or blue, flower-trimmed.

Usage notesEdit

Using the term champagne to describe, for the purposes of sale, sparkling wine not manufactured in the Champagne region of France using the méthode champenoise is an infringement of trademark law in many countries.

Alternative formsEdit

SynonymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

Coordinate termsEdit

  • (wine): cava (Spanish sparkling white wine made with the méthode champenoise), prosecco (Italian sparkling white wine made by dual fermentation method in vats), spumante (Italian sparkling wine, sometimes made with the méthode champenoise)

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AdjectiveEdit

champagne (not comparable)

  1. Of a very pale brownish-gold colour, similar to that of champagne.
    • 1962 September 14, “The Champagne Blondes, Vintage ’62: (Go On … Live a Little!) [advertisement]”, in Henry R[obinson] Luce, editor, Life, volume 53, number 11, Chicago, Ill.; New York, N.Y.: Time Inc., ISSN 0024-3019, OCLC 34142982, page 95:
      This is the year! With champagne colors the thing on the fashion scene, Clairol is popping the corks on 4 new Champagne Blondes®! [] Clairol's Creme Toner is your choice of Champagne color.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

champagne (third-person singular simple present champagnes, present participle champagning, simple past and past participle champagned)

  1. (transitive) To ply or treat with champagne.
    • 1989, Bruce Babington; Peter William Evans, “‘The Love Parade’: Lubitsch and Romantic Comedy”, in Affairs to Remember: The Hollywood Comedy of the Sexes, Manchester; New York, N.Y.: Manchester University Press, →ISBN, page 88:
      And equally, the central matter of Henry's infidelities has no actual dramatisation, so that we never see him coming out of a stage door with a Follies girl on his arm, or champagning a debutante, let alone entering a boudoir.
  2. (intransitive) To drink champagne.
    • 1814 April 9, Lord Byron; Thomas Moore, “Letter CLXXIV. To Mr. Moore.”, in Letters and Journals of Lord Byron: With Notices of His Life, by Thomas Moore. In Two Volumes, volume I, London: John Murray, [], published 1830, OCLC 614408664, page 540:
      We clareted and champagned till two—then supped, and finished with a kind of regency punch composed of madeira, brandy, and green tea, no real water being admitted therein.
    • 1846, Richard Henry Bonnycastle, “Emigrants and Immigration”, in Canada and the Canadians, in 1846. [...] In Two Volumes, volume I, London: Henry Colburn, publisher, [], OCLC 52722204, page 34:
      On one occasion, I was at a meeting of the turf in an hotel after the races, where violent discussions and heavy champagning were going on.

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From the region Champagne, from Late Latin campānia (in this case, Campania Remensis specifically), from campāneus, from Latin campus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

champagne m (plural champagnes)

  1. (countable, uncountable) champagne (wine from the Champagne region of France).
  2. (countable, uncountable, non-European French, informal) sparkling wine, generic champagne.
  3. (countable, heraldry) base; bottom third of a coat of arms.

Usage notesEdit

Using the term champagne to describe, for the purposes of sale, sparkling wine not manufactured in the Champagne region of France using the méthode champenoise is an infringement of trademark law in many countries.

DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French champagne, champaigne, from Late Latin campānia, from campāneus, from Latin campus. Compare Occitan campanha, Catalan campanya, Italian campagna, Spanish campaña, Portuguese campanha. Doublet of campagne.

NounEdit

champagne f (plural champagnes)

  1. (rare) an expanse of flat and open cultivated earth

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French champagne, from Champagne, from Late Latin campania. Doublet of campagna.

NounEdit

champagne m (inv)

  1. champagne (wine)
  2. champagne (color)

AdjectiveEdit

champagne (inv)

  1. champagne (color)

MalayEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English champagne, from French champagne, from Champagne, from Late Latin campania, from campāneus, from Latin campus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

champagne

  1. champagne (sparkling wine made in Champagne)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French champagne.

NounEdit

champagne m (definite singular champagnen, indefinite plural champagner, definite plural champagnene)

  1. champagne

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French champagne.

NounEdit

champagne m (definite singular champagnen, indefinite plural champagnar, definite plural champagnane)

  1. champagne

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

champagne m (plural champagnes)

  1. Alternative spelling of champanhe

SpanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

See champán.

NounEdit

champagne m (plural champagnes)

  1. champagne

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French champagne.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

champagne c

  1. champagne (wine from the Champagne region)

DeclensionEdit

Declension of champagne 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative champagne champagnen
Genitive champagnes champagnens