charabanc

EnglishEdit

 
horse-drawn charabanc, 19th c.
 
motorized charabanc, 1920s

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French char-à-bancs (literally carriage with benches).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

charabanc (plural charabancs)

  1. (Britain, historical) A horse-drawn, and then later, motorized omnibus with open sides, and often, no roof.
    Synonym: chara (short form)
    • 1931, Francis Beeding, “2/2”, in Death Walks in Eastrepps[1]:
      A little further on, to the right, was a large garage, where the charabancs stood, half in and half out of the yard.
    • 1968, “Happiness Stan”, in Ogdens' Nut Gone Flake, performed by Small Faces:
      And full of colored dreams / Deep inside a rainbow / Lived Happiness Stan / In a small Victorian charabanc
    • 2006 Aug 7 & 14, John Updike, “Late Works”, in The New Yorker, page 70:
      The cumbersome though finely painted charabanc of the late James style is pulled swaying along by a frisky pony of a plot farcical and romantic.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

charabanc (third-person singular simple present charabancs, present participle charabancing, simple past and past participle charabanced)

  1. (rare, transitive, intransitive) To travel or convey by charabanc.

Further readingEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French char-à-bancs (a carriage with benches).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sjarəbanɡ/, [ɕɑɑˈb̥ɑŋ]

NounEdit

charabanc c (singular definite charabancen or charabanc'en, plural indefinite charabancer or charabanc'er)

  1. charabanc

InflectionEdit