charlatan

See also: charlatán

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle French charlatan, from Old Italian ciarlatano (quack), a blend of ciarlatore (chatterer) + cerretano (hawker, quack, literally native of Cerreto) (Cerreto di Spoleto being a village in Umbria, known for its quacks).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

charlatan (plural charlatans)

  1. (obsolete) A mountebank, someone who addresses crowds in the street; (especially), an itinerant seller of medicines or drugs.
    • 1751, Tobias Smollett, The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, vol I, ch. 38:
      The poor foreigner, more dead than alive, answered that he was an Italian charlatan, who had practised with some reputation in Padua [] .
  2. A malicious trickster; a fake person, especially one who deceives for personal profit.
    Synonyms: trickster, swindler; see also Thesaurus:deceiver
    • 2018 (June), Ian Murray in The Independent
      That this disgraceful charlatan holds one of the great offices of state in this country should be a source of constant shame and embarrassment to the Prime Minister.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian ciarlatano. Pejorative meaning first recorded 1668.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

charlatan m (plural charlatans, feminine charlatane)

  1. (dated) a streetseller of medicines
  2. a charlatan (trickster)
  3. a quack

Further readingEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

NounEdit

charlatan m (plural charlatans)

  1. a street-seller of medicines

DescendantsEdit

  • English: charlatan
  • French: charlatan

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French charlatan. Cognate of English charlatan, German Scharlatan.

NounEdit

charlatan c

  1. fraudster, deceiver

DeclensionEdit

Declension of charlatan 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative charlatan charlatanen charlataner charlatanerna
Genitive charlatans charlatanens charlataners charlatanernas

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit