Open main menu

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English cheveteyn, cheftayne, a variant of Old French chevetaine, from Late Latin capitaneus (English captain), from Latin caput (head), from Proto-Indo-European *kauput- (English head). Doublet of captain.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtʃiːf.tən/, /ˈtʃiːf.tɪn/

NounEdit

chieftain (plural chieftains)

  1. A leader of a clan or tribe.
    • 1970, Kazimierz Godłowski, “The chronology of the Late Roman and early migration periods in Central Europe”, in Acta scientiarum litterarumque: Schedae archeologicae[1], Nakładem Uniwersytetu Jagiellonśkiego, page 22:
      They were probably the work of individual craftsmen working to meet the chieftains' needs. Their place in the chronology of the big cemeteries is indicated by the less richly-decorated double-springed bronze brooches which are found here.
  2. A leader of a group.
    The robber chieftain divided up the spoils.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English cheftayne, from Old French chevetaine, from Late Latin capitaneus, from Latin caput (head), from Proto-Indo-European *kauput-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

chieftain (plural chieftains)

  1. chieftain
  2. (possibly) schore; leader of a Highlands clan